The Ultimate Guide to UX Design

Think about a website or app you love. What do you love about it? The ease of gathering relevant information? Or how you can buy something in one-click (and have it delivered tomorrow)? Or how quickly it answers your questions?

Now think about the people who created that website. What was their goal?

They were trying to create a site that had the features you love about it. A site that is easy to use, effectively delivers the information you need, and allows you to make smart decisions tailored to your challenges or concerns.

UX, or user experience, focuses on the end-user’s overall experience, including their perceptions, emotions, and responses to a company’s product, system, or service. UX is defined by criteria including: ease of use, accessibility, and convenience. The concept of UX is most often talked about in terms of tech, such as smartphones, computers, software, and websites. This is why UX is not only a fairly new field, but changes quickly due to technology advancements, new types of interactions, and user preferences.

It’s no secret that customers today want quick and simple ways to meet their needs and solve their pain points. That’s why UX matters so much.

Whether or not you’re in tech, the company you own or work for most likely has a website right? Well, customers could write you off in a matter of seconds if they don’t find your website useful and easy to use. In fact, most website visitors determine whether or not they want to leave within a minute of opening a page.

Follow along to learn more about the importance of the emerging field of UX, what designers are being hired to do at a wide range of companies today, and why every type of business can benefit from thoughtful UX design.

What Is UX Design?

UX design, or user experience design, is the process of increasing a user’s level of satisfaction with a product or service by improving its functionality, ease of use and convenience. UX design is about creating products, “that provide meaningful and relevant experiences to users.” Within UX design, there are a few different categories of study to understand.

1. Interaction Design

A subset of UX design is interaction design, or IxD. It is defined as … yup, you guessed it… the interaction between a user and a product, with the goal of that interaction being a pleasant experience for the user.

2. Visual Design

In visual design, creators use illustrations, photography, typography, space, layouts, and color to enhance user experience.To have successful visual design, artistic design principles including balance, space, and contrast are crucial. Color, shape, size, and other elements also impact visual design.

3. User Research 

User research is the last major element of UX design. User research is the way in which companies determine what their customers and users want and need. At its core, your website should solve a problem, and so this is an important step in determining what exactly your users require. Without it, your designs are simply guesses.

4. Information Architecture

Designers use information architecture to structure and label content so that users can find information easily. Information architecture is used on websites, smartphones, apps, and even in the physical places we go. Ease of use and findability are two important factors of information architecture, which is why it is so closely related to UX design.Think about the New York City Subway map. This is a great example of information architecture that helps people understand how to get from one place to the next. According to the Information Architecture Institute, “If you’re making things for others, you’re practicing information architecture.”

information-architecture

Source: NYC Subway Guide

UX Design Processes

There are typically three stages of the UX design process to consider: researching your target audience, understanding the company’s goals and how those goals impact the user, and applying out-of-the-box thinking to create an enjoyable end user experience.

UX design takes a human-centered design approach to create purposeful things for users during all three stages. This is about considering the needs of the people you are designing for, coming up with a wide range of solutions to resolve the issue they are facing, designing prototypes for the users to test, and then finally putting the best solution in place for the user. If you look at the issue from the perspective of the user, and design with them in mind, you will create solutions they will want to adopt.

UX Design Principles

UX is an ever-changing field, but the fundamental UX design principles remain the same. Designers also have to determine what they want in terms of visual balance. Being clear and concise is crucial … less is more! You want your design to be intuitive, and most importantly, your design should meet the user’s needs.

While UX is definitely subject to trends and new technology, there are a few core principles that stay the same. These help designers look at various different problems through a methodology that’s consistent and focused.

  • Be contextual: You want individuals to know exactly where they are in their user journey. They should never feel lost or overwhelmed. Your design is there to guide them along their journey.
  • Be human: No user enjoys feeling like they are interacting with a machine. You’ll gain the trust of the end user if you show them your brand’s personality and approachability.
  • Be findable: Users don’t want to waste time. With successful UX design, your work will be easy to find and navigate.
  • Be easy: Being consistent and straightforward will go a long way with your users. You build relationships with your users by providing them with enjoyable and easy experiences.
  • Be simple: No fluff, tangents, or unnecessary descriptions. Get to the point. Let’s be honest here … these days, everyone has a short attention span.

UX Deliverables

Once a UX project is completed, the designer and team will present a list of deliverables for review to a client or an internal team. They need to showcase their process and get buy-in for their ideas.

UX deliverables, which are a critical part of the design process, are the tangible records of the work that has occurred. These deliverables help UX designers to effectively communicate their design ideas and research findings and make it clear to stakeholders why recommendations for changes and improvements are made.

1. User Research

User needs, tendencies, and motivations can be determined through different types of user research. This might include quantitative and qualitative data from user testing sessions and focus groups. It could detail feedback on sign up flows, the onboarding process, and customer service inquiries. The goal is to have a detailed analysis of what’s both working on the site and what could be improved — and to have this all backed by information gathered from users. Researchers may create buyer personas based off of real user data to help them accurately determine who will be using their device, website, or app. Through user research, designers understand and empathize with the user.

2. Competitor Assessment

Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of your competitors is a way to enhance your own UX strategy. A great way to do this is by creating a competitive analysis report that details the interaction design of your competitors and provides an analysis of where you see pitfalls and missed opportunities — things your business can take advantage of.

3. Interaction Design

An interaction design deliverable could come in the form of a prototype so that people can review how interactions with the site would occur — showing how people would complete key tasks, get information, use a product, the flow of finding information, and how easy the product is to use. You want your prototype to be as similar to the final product as possible, so you can get sign off on the design before you begin building it.

4. Information Architecture

IA is the process of taking information and organizing it in a way that is easy to understand. For large websites, this is especially important, as you need to understand what content exists and how to organize it in a way that makes sense for your visitors. The end result might be a content inventory, a sitemap with suggested navigation, or sample user flows that reveal how visitors move through a site.

site-map

Source: Adobe Blog

What Is User Interface Design?

Remember when Apple unveiled their click wheel for the iPod? When it was introduced, the feature was intuitive and highly functional — not to mention cool looking. This is a great example of successful user interface, or UI. UI refers to the ways in which people interact with computers, machines, websites, apps, wearables, and other programs or devices. User interface design is the process of making these things as easy to use and efficient as possible. 

Common UI Elements

Although UX and UI have similar definitions, it’s important to note the key differences that separate the two topics. Again, UI focuses on a product’s appearances and surfaces, while UX is more concerned with how people interact with a site. Here are some common UI terms you should know to better understand how the two differentiate:

  • Informational Components: UI designers use informational components to enhance the reading experience or give more information. Examples of informational components are progress bars, notifications, and message boxes. Designers use these when they want to make it clear to the user that they have completed a task, or if they want to notify the user that an action on their part is necessary.
  • Breadcrumb Navigation: This is a design tool often used by UI designers to visually increase the usability of a website. It allows users to see their location on a site in a hierarchical structure. It doesn’t need to have special visual features or over-the-top design — it should just clearly state where a person is located on a site. You may have noticed these links along the top of a webpage while online shopping or on another site.
  • Input Controls: Input Controls give individuals multiple options in response to a question you are asking. These are things like checkboxes, drop-down lists, and toggles. Keep the information you are asking in your input controls simple and to-the-point so it’s easy to find what the user needs.

breadcrumb-navigation


Source: UX Planet

User Experience Research

Without research, all of this focus on what the user needs and wants would be impossible. UX research is the investigation of users and what they need, which informs the UX design process. Companies and designers use this research to come to specific conclusions about what is working for users and what needs to be changed. There are several ways companies and designers perform UX research.

Usability Testing

Usability testing evaluates how successful a product is by testing it on actual users. It gives companies real input on how individuals are using a product or system and how that product or system works for that user. There are two primary testing methods. 

Hallway usability testing is a quick and cheap way for companies and researchers to get information from users who may have no knowledge of your company or products. Random individuals use the products and give feedback on their experience.

Remote usability testing allows companies to conduct research with users in their natural environment (such as in their home or office). These tests can be moderated in any way the company chooses.

Usability Testing Tools

Usability testing tools allow researchers and designers to compile accurate feedback from users, and then analyze that feedback to make data-driven changes. If you’re looking for a tool that can help you test how easy-to-use your site or product is, check out these options:

  • Crazy Egg: This tool allows companies to see exactly what users are clicking on while on their website. Crazy Egg also records exactly where site visitors are coming from, including geographic location, and if they were referred from another site.
  • Hotjar: This tool combines analytics and feedback to give an overview on ways to improve user experience. They do this through the use of heatmaps, visitor rates, conversion funnels, and more.

For more usability testing tools to consider, check out this post.

How to Enhance User Experience

Through the research and testing mentioned above, user experiences can always be improved. Some of the most common ways to improve user experience include: Taking a consultative approach to improving the experience, determining calls to action, implementing responsive web design, taking Fitt’s Law into consideration (more on this next), avoiding overwhelming data entry, and more.

Using Fitt’s Law to Enhance UX

Fitt’s law is a predictive model that determines the amount of time it takes for a specific user to move their mouse or cursor to a target area on a website. There are multiple versions of Fitt’s law that exist but they all revolve around the general idea that, “The time required to move to a target depends on the distance to it, yet relates inversely to its size.” Fitt’s law is widely used in UX design to improve ergonomics in addition to usability for users.

Here’s an example of this at work: Have you seen the new Touch Bar on Apple’s MacBook Pro? This is a touchscreen above the keyboard that speeds up a user’s experience when using Google, bookmarking a page, changing screen brightness, volume, and more. Touch Bar options change depending on what page you are browsing while on your laptop, whether that be an app, a site you are visiting, or even just your personal settings.

With the Touch Bar, the user’s experience is simplified because many commonly used settings are in one compact location. Fitt’s law states the further away and smaller an object or button is for a user, the harder it is for that user to click on it. That’s why the Touch Bar is such a great example of taking Fitt’s Law and successfully applying it to your device to enhance user experience.

UX Design Tools

Whether you are researching, prototyping, wireframing, storyboarding, or creating graphics, there are multiple UX tools available to assist you during the design process. In fact, there are so many tools on the market, some free and some that require a subscription fee, that it may be overwhelming for designers who are unsure of exactly what they need. To get you started, here’s a list of some popular and valuable tools to use in your UX design work:

1. Adobe Fireworks

Adobe Fireworks CS6 gives web designers a way to create graphics for their web pages without getting into the code or design details. There are a few reasons why UX designers use Adobe Fireworks: The tool has impressive pixel accuracy, has image compression abilities (JPEG, GIF etc.), allows users to create functional websites, and build vectors. This is a great option especially if you are already familiar with other programs in the Creative Cloud.

2. Adobe XD

With Adobe XD, you can design websites and mobile apps, as well as create prototypes, wireframes, and vector designs. Users can share interactive prototypes on multiple platforms, including Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android, so it’s perfect for team collaboration.

3. Axure

Axure RP Pro is another great UX design tool — that’s also free. Axure has several capabilities including wireframing, prototyping, and documenting. It can even help you create user flows and sitemaps. Axure is perfect for creating web and desktop applications, and it gives users the ability to easily export to PDF or HTML for review.

4. Adobe Illustrator and a Free Alternative

If you’re looking for an affordable alternative to Adobe software, such as Adobe Illustrator (which is primarily used to create vector graphics), we’ve got you. Inkscape is known for doing most of what Illustrator does, but for free. This software is open source and can be used to create impressive vector graphics. The only issue you could run into is lag, as some users have reported that the program is slow. If you’re partial to Illustrator, that’s OK too.

5. Sketch

Sketch is an end-to-end software with specific features including non-destructive editing (meaning Sketch won’t change the pixels in the photo you are working with), code export, pixel precision, prototyping, vector editing, and more. With Sketch, you can reuse and update your designs easily.

6. Storyboard Software

You might be wondering why you would need to storyboard in UX design. It’s a great way to visually predict and review the way a user would interact with and experience a product in a broader context. There are several storyboard tools available, with varying levels of features and complexity.

Storyboarder is a free storyboard software option, which has basic features made for designers of all levels. This software allows users to quickly create drawings and stick figures to lay out a plot or idea.

Another storyboard software option is Toon Boom Storyboard Pro. It combines drawing, animation, camera controls, and numerous other features, all for an annual or monthly fee. It has a wider range of features for more complex storytelling and detailed prep work. Both options are great for designers looking to visually tell a story through interface design.

How to Become a UX Designer

If you love designing, researching, working with other people in a fast-paced environment, and listening to others’ experiences, then you might want to consider a career in UX design. In this career path, you’d focus on the conceptual aspects of design and create better experiences for users.

To become a UX designer, there are a few necessary steps you will have to take. There are plenty of higher education courses available around the world, though they typically require a four-year undergraduate design curriculum as a prerequisite. However, some programs allow for more flexibility, such as the online Quinnipiac University Graduate Program in User Experience Design. There are also UX certification programs for professionals. These vary in commitment length and level of expertise upon receipt of the certificate.

Once you’re ready to start applying for your dream UX job, you’ll need a stand-out resume and a flashy portfolio. You can use a site like Dribbble or Behance to showcase your work, or you can create your own site using a website building tool like SquareSpace.

When building your portfolio site, keep these tips in mind:

Make it visually stunning.

Presentation is everything. Your work should speak for itself … show don’t tell! Your choice in color, typography, and layout all play a factor here.

Include an “about” page.

Hiring managers and recruiters want to get to know you, how you think about design, what inspires you, and what makes you unique. Why should they hire you? What value can you add to your new potential company and team?

Have clear navigation and links throughout your portfolio site.

Can you imagine the hiring manager at your dream company having a hard time navigating the portfolio site of a UX designer? Awkward. In your navigation bar, include options such as: “portfolio,” “about,” “contact,” and “resume” to avoid any confusion.

Explain your personal UX process.

Your future employer wants to know how you think. Include information that lets the hiring manager in on your UX researching, brainstorming, wireframing, designing, and prototyping processes.

Create additional portfolios to expand your network.

Use other tools to make your work available on sites where designers and those looking to hire designers spend their time. Behance and Dribble are great portfolio sites for people looking for inspiration, networking, and new career opportunities.

Conclusion

Whether you’re a graphic designer, blogger, developer, or someone in an entirely different field, UX design can help you and your company grow. A happy end-user is the key to success, and without well-crafted UX design, this would be impossible to achieve.

As technology becomes more ubiquitous in our lives, successful UX design will continue to create seamless transitions between individuals and their devices and apps. UX design has never been more important, making it an exciting time to join the field and consider the benefits for your own business.

from Marketing https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/ux-user-experience

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13 Non-Technical Ways to Make Your Computer Run Faster

If your computer is constantly cursed by the spinning wheel of death, or you feel like you’re using a 90’s Netscape browser to surf the web, fear not — it doesn’t necessarily mean you need a new computer.

You can implement some simple fixes to make your computer run faster, and most of them only take a few minutes to complete. Let’s flesh them out below.

1. Check your hard disk space.

A common rule of thumb to keep your computer running fast is to have at least 15% of its hard disk space free. If your hard disk is almost full, you need to remove some programs and files to improve your computer’s speed. But if your disk has plenty of room, there could be something wrong with your operating system.

2. Organize desktop icons into folders.

Organizing desktop icons into folders cleans up your background, and it also cuts down your computer’s RAM usage. Your computer has to load each individual icon when you don’t organize your desktop, which takes up a lot of RAM space. If each icon is in a folder, then your computer only needs to load each folder.

3. Save old pictures and videos to the cloud or an external hard drive.

If you have old pictures and videos on your computer that you rarely look at but don’t want to delete, transfer them to the cloud or an external hard drive. You’ll save a ton of memory on your computer and improve its speed.

4. Close unused tabs.

Sometimes, you need to keep a bunch of tabs open to complete an important project — but if you’re done looking at a web page, it’s best to close it. Unused tabs on internet browsers hog a ton of memory and slow down your computer.

5. Uninstall unused programs.

Most computers have pre-installed programs that you’ll never use, but even though you’ve never opened them, they slow down your computer by using up memory, wasting a ton of disk space, and running background processes. Be careful not to remove any programs you don’t recognize, though. They could be crucial for the function of your computer or other applications.

6. Delete temporary files.

Temporary files like internet history, cookies, and caches take up a ton of space on your hard disk. Deleting them frees up valuable space on your hard disk and speeds up your computer.

On Mac OS X, you can download CCleaner to find and delete temporary files in your hard disk. To delete temporary files on Windows, you can run a disk cleanup, which you can access by clicking Start > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Cleanup.

7. Stop programs from automatically launching when your computer turns on.

If you can’t justify Spotify launching every time you turn on your computer, consider stopping it from happening. Programs that automatically launch and keep running eat up a lot of your computer’s memory.

To remove the items that automatically launch on OS X, click the Apple icon, navigate to Systems Preferences, then to Users & Groups, and finally to Login Items. Here, you’ll see all the programs that automatically launch when your computer starts, and you can uncheck each one.

On Windows, click the Start menu, search for “msconfig”, and then click on the Startup tab. A list of programs will pop up, and you can uncheck the ones you don’t want automatically launching.

8. Remove unnecessary language resources.

Each default language on your computer uses a ton of resources and files that devours free space on your hard disk. To remove any unused languages on OS X, download Monolingual. To remove them on Windows, go to Settings > Time & Language > Region & Language, click on the languages you don’t use, and, finally, click Remove.

9. Update your computer’s software.

Updating your computer’s software can be a drag, but it’s definitely worth it: new software updates fix bugs and glitches that slow down your computer. To check if your current software is up-to-date on a Mac, go to Apps under the Apple icon menu and click on Updates. On Windows, click the Start Button > All Programs > Windows Update > Check for Updates.

10. If you can scramble an egg on your computer, give it a break.

A constantly overheated computer will eventually turn into a sluggish computer. If your laptop is hot to the touch, it’s working too hard and you need to let it cool down. To ventilate your computer, point a fan at it and use it on a flat surface, so air can properly flow underneath it.

11. Shut down or restart your computer at least once a week.

When you leave your computer on, background programs and applications hog its memory. Shutting down or restarting your computer refreshes your memory and prompts important tools to run maintenance on it. As a general guideline, shutting down or restarting your computer at least once a week will help speed it up.

12. Remove unused dashboard widgets or gadgets.

Dashboard Widgets on OS X and Gadgets on Windows devour RAM space because they run background updates, even when you’re not using them. You can use Widget Manager on OS X to delete these space-wasters. And on Windows, all you have to do is right click and uninstall the Gadgets you don’t use.

13. Delete browser extensions or plugins you don’t use.

Browser extensions and plugins are some of the most convenient applications on the internet. But installing too many can slow down your web browser’s speed — especially if you forgot about most of them. To help boost your browser’s speed, uninstall the extensions or plugins that you don’t use anymore.

from Marketing https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/make-your-computer-faster

Employees as brand advocates: First impressions count

Making your business stand out from the crowd is the goal of every organisation’s marketing campaign. In a world where competition comes from beyond your geographical location, hitting the right chord with your customers is essential.

Every aspect of your business should be geared towards adding value to your brand, and one area that you should consider is how your employees represent your brand.

Why brand matters to employees

If your brand is mismatched to the products and services that you offer, how can your employees fully embrace and promote the ethos of your business? A strong brand is as important to your employees as it is to your customers and clients. It should inspire them to perform their tasks to support and integrate the culture of your business into everyday operations.

  • Boosts Engagement

Engaged employees are more productive and are unified in their wishes to excel and turn into brand ambassadors rather than simply employees. You can develop this sense of engagement by introducing a workplace uniform. A new range of corporate clothing by 4imprint is a prime example of how your brand can be used in everyday operations to make a good first impression to customers and colleagues alike.

This is because creating the right first impression can help instil confidence and trust in the brand and your business, as the infographic from 4imprint shows below. After all, how you operate within your organisation is intrinsically linked to how you want it to be perceived from the outside!

  • Provides a Consistent Business Image

Whether you have a new starter or have had people working for you for years, there’s an aspect of how people decide to dress for work at your organisation that can cause concern. 7 out of 10 new employees have stated that having branded business clothing would have made their first day easier to manage, with 95% identifying that making the right first impression was very important to them. One of the most common worst impressions which a new employee can make is, quite simply, turning up underdressed for their role.

Professional workplace clothing eliminates the stress that dressing for work can cause and allows you to have control over the business image you wish to project and how your employees represent your business.

  • Increases Corporate Identity

Having a recognisable brand is important to distinguish you from your competitors and is a way of advertising your business and boosting brand awareness. A strong corporate identity signals to customers key information your brand and they will have expectations associated with it. It also provides a clear framework for your employees to work within and the standards which you expect from them.

Your brand is more than a logo that you have chosen to represent your business; it can be a valuable tool that can help your business grow from the inside out. Research has shown that the first 26 seconds of meeting someone is all that it takes to make a decision about a brand, company or person, so it is vital that you pay attention to the finer details.

Introducing company uniforms can help your employees become brand advocates and are a successful way to boost your employees’ engagement with your business to create a consistent and lasting impression on your customers and clients.

Making your business stand out from the crowd is the goal of every organisation’s marketing campaign. In a world where competition comes from beyond your geographical location, hitting the right chord with your customers is essential. Every aspect of your business should be geared towards adding value to your brand, and one area that you should consider is how your employees represent your brand.

Why brand matters to employees

If your brand is mismatched to the products and services that you offer, how can your employees fully embrace and promote the ethos of your business? A strong brand is as important to your employees as it is to your customers and clients. It should inspire them to perform their tasks to support and integrate the culture of your business into everyday operations.

  • Boosts Engagement

Engaged employees are more productive and are unified in their wishes to excel and turn into brand ambassadors rather than simply employees. You can develop this sense of engagement by introducing a workplace uniform. A new range of corporate clothing by 4imprint is a prime example of how your brand can be used in everyday operations to make a good first impression to customers and colleagues alike.

This is because creating the right first impression can help instil confidence and trust in the brand and your business, as the infographic from 4imprint shows below. After all, how you operate within your organisation is intrinsically linked to how you want it to be perceived from the outside!

  • Provides a Consistent Business Image

Whether you have a new starter or have had people working for you for years, there’s an aspect of how people decide to dress for work at your organisation that can cause concern. 7 out of 10 new employees have stated that having branded business clothing would have made their first day easier to manage, with 95% identifying that making the right first impression was very important to them. One of the most common worst impressions which a new employee can make is, quite simply, turning up underdressed for their role.

Professional workplace clothing eliminates the stress that dressing for work can cause and allows you to have control over the business image you wish to project and how your employees represent your business.

  • Increases Corporate Identity

Having a recognisable brand is important to distinguish you from your competitors and is a way of advertising your business and boosting brand awareness. A strong corporate identity signals to customers key information your brand and they will have expectations associated with it. It also provides a clear framework for your employees to work within and the standards which you expect from them.

Your brand is more than a logo that you have chosen to represent your business; it can be a valuable tool that can help your business grow from the inside out. Research has shown that the first 26 seconds of meeting someone is all that it takes to make a decision about a brand, company or person, so it is vital that you pay attention to the finer details.

Introducing company uniforms can help your employees become brand advocates and are a successful way to boost your employees’ engagement with your business to create a consistent and lasting impression on your customers and clients.

The post Employees as brand advocates: First impressions count appeared first on TheMarketingblog.

from TheMarketingblog http://www.themarketingblog.co.uk/2018/06/employees-as-brand-advocates-first-impressions-count/

UX vs. UI: What’s the Difference?

Understanding the difference between UX and UI can get confusing — the roles work closely together, and sometimes the terms are used too ambiguously to firmly understand either one.

To understand the difference between UX and UI, let’s start with an example: YouTube.

Take a look at the YouTube home screen. Everything you’re seeing — the search bar at the top, the “Trending” and “Subscriptions” and “History” categories on the left, the “Recommended” videos below — is all the work of a UI designer.

At its most basic level, UI is the presentation and interactivity of a product — where’s the sign-up button, is it easy to navigate, where’s the logo and if I click the logo where does it take me?

Now, imagine every YouTube video you click loads slowly. Imagine you search “cats” and nothing comes up. Imagine you can’t search account user’s by their username, so it’s hard for you to find that girl who sang an acoustic rendition of that Ed Sheeran song.

With those actions, you’re having a less-than-ideal user experience. You don’t enjoy engaging with the product, and it isn’t offering you what you want. Those problems are the responsibility of a UX designer.

Cognitive scientist Don Norman, who first coined the term UX in the 1990s, and Jakob Nielsen, co-founder of the Nielsen Norman Group, explain the difference of UX versus UI this way:

“Consider a website with movie reviews. Even if the UI for finding a film is perfect, the UX will be poor for a user who wants information about a small independent release if the underlying database only contains movies from the major studios.”

In this example, both UX and UI are critical components for the user to enjoy the product, but a user can’t appreciate the interface of a product if the product itself doesn’t deliver what the user wants.

Let’s define UX and UI in more detail now, to further clarify the difference between the two.

What’s UX?

UX, which stands for user experience, is the process of researching, developing, and refining all aspects of a user’s interaction with a company to ensure the company is meeting the user’s needs. A UX designer must ensure people find value when they interact with a company’s products or services.

A UX designer is responsible for all aspects of a user’s interaction — this means a UX designer is not solely responsible for the technology behind a product. They’re responsible for how a user interacts with a company both on and offline, including customer service and other facets.

Essentially, a UX designer must answer the question: “How can my company’s product best meet our user’s needs?”

Now, what’s left for a UI designer to do?

What’s UI?

A UI designer’s responsibilities are more cosmetic than a UX designer’s — a UI designer is responsible for the presentation of a product. But that doesn’t mean a UI designer just picks some pictures and a logo and calls it a day.

A UI designer is responsible for how everything on a page aligns in relation to each other. The visual elements you see on a page, such as buttons and icons, and the interactivity of a product, falls on the UI designer.

Have you ever visited a website and thought, “Wow, this company is really cool and has a great product, but what really sold me was their website’s intuitive and sleek layout?”

That’s largely due to their UI designer.

How do UX and UI work together?

Now that we’ve explored UX and UI separately, let’s see how they function collaboratively.

Let’s say your company wants to develop a running app, so your CEO hires a UX designer. The UX designer is first going to do some research into competitor’s apps and your user’s pain points.

With this information, she will decide the core features of the app (“must monitor heart rate and mileage”), and explore user personas in-depth to create a site map and initial prototype.

From there, a UX designer will create wireframes, test and refine them, and convert those wireframes into mockups. Then, the UX designer will conduct research and refine the product for the market. Throughout all stages, the UX designer is focused on the structure and value of the product and how that product is or isn’t meeting user’s needs.

Towards the end of development, a UI designer will then take control over the app’s appearance, including on-screen forms, images, buttons, links, and icons.

As you can see, the primary difference between UX and UI is goals: a UX designer is focused on the users’ experience, including anything that might motivate or frustrate them, why they would or wouldn’t enjoy the product, and what the product needs to include to delight the user.

A UI designer is given those constraints — she’s told what the app must include and exclude, and how it’s going to work. Using those constraints as a guideline, she works on the design and interactivity to ensure the user understands the product and enjoys the presentation of it.

You can’t create an exceptional product without both UX and UI. Without a UX designer, YouTube would appear beautiful and appealing but completely unusable. And, without a UI designer, YouTube would be a great idea in theory but would be difficult and confusing to navigate on the screen. 

from Marketing https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/ux-vs-ui

17 Inspiring Instagram Video Examples From Oreo, GoPro, BuzzFeed & More

Remember when Instagram first started allowing users to post videos back in 2013?

The first Instagram videos had to be recorded on your phone and could only be up to 15 seconds long. Those were the days that people compared Instagram video to its Twitter-owned counterpart, Vine.

Instagram has come a long way since then, and it’s blown Vine out of the water. Like most of the other popular social networks, the folks at Instagram have made changes to its platform that make it easier for people to post and share videos.

In late March 2016, Instagram announced they’d start rolling out the ability for Instagram users to upload 60-second videos. For iOS users, they added that users will soon be able to make videos out of multiple clips from your camera roll.

Thanks to these changes, marketers can use the Instagram app to relate with their fans and customers, to communicate their business’ personalities and brand stories, and to express artistic creativity.

There are a lot of brands who are posting great photos on social media. But what about videos? While brands have been slower to adapt to Instagram’s video platform, many of the ones that are experimenting with it are doing it really well. Check out the examples below.

17 of the Best Instagram Video Examples

Click anywhere on the videos to play them, and click again to pause them.

1. Oreo

Oreo is known for its simple, creative social media content — and its Instagram videos don’t disappoint. The video below is a great example of a fun, creative video that works perfectly for the platform.

While we love the sound quality in this video — how satisfying is the sound of pen on paper? — it doesn’t require sound to make sense. This is a really smart move because when you’re viewing any video on Instagram, you’ll hear sound only if your device’s volume is turned on. If your phone is set to silent or vibrate — which is the case for many people, especially when they’re perusing Instagram in public — then the video will play with the sound off.

Keep this in mind when you’re planning your next Instagram video: It should either be eye-catching enough to draw people to turn on the sound within the first few seconds, or it should be able to play without sound.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BDin77DxtAH/embed/captioned/?v=7

2. Burger King

Here’s another Instagram video that doesn’t require sound. In fact, it’s completely silent — and the reasoning is very clever. The Burger King (yes, that’s the name of their mascot) is famously silent.

But on the 199th anniversary of National American Sign Language (ASL) Day, he broke his silence both on Instagram with the video below, and on YouTube with a longer video — a great example of paring down a longer YouTube video to fit Instagram’s platform.

In the video, the Burger King calls on their deaf fans to ask what the official sign for their famous burger, the “Whopper,” should be. The video encourages fans to submit ideas via social media using the #WhopperSign hashtag.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEJ1KHczP7O/embed/captioned/?v=7

When a winning hand sign was picked, here’s how they changed their logo to celebrate:

whopper-sign-burger-king.png

Image Credit: AdAge

3. GoPro

If you know anything about GoPro, you’re probably picturing the company’s Instagram account accurately: extreme sports shot from GoPro’s classic fish-eye lens. The video below is one of the few longer Instagram videos out there that you’re happy to watch all the way through. Right from the still image before you press play, you know what’s waiting for you.

The video’s first-person point of view gives you an intensely intimate experience that any business page desires to give to its followers.

 

4. Reebok

Inspiring content tends to do very well on social media, especially Instagram. This video is clearly the work of professionals, which not every brand has the resources for. But the message, which is part of a larger campaign shared across their website and other social networks, is both beautiful and shareable: You have 25,915 days: What will you do with them?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEwR1j5y1Bk/embed/captioned/?v=7

5. BuzzFeed Tasty

The videos BuzzFeed Tasty puts out on Instagram and Facebook are simply perfect for those two platforms: They’re visual, helpful, shareable, light-hearted … and, best of all, they’re simple. When I watch these videos, I want to save them somewhere so I can refer back to them when I want to make the recipe myself. (Plus, I love the music they use.)

“We want people to be able to watch the video and feel like they can pull it off at home,” Andrew Gauthier, creative director of BuzzFeed Motion Pictures, told CBS.

The folks at BuzzFeed have published more than 500 “Tasty” videos since last July, and they’ve been viewed 14 billion times, mostly on Facebook. But these videos are perfect for Instagram’s visual platform, too. Thanks to Instagram’s decision to extend video length to 60 seconds, BuzzFeed is able to post full recipe videos along with a caption explaining exactly how it’s done.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BBnu4lMGo2y/embed/captioned/?v=7

6. Livia Sala

Here’s another food- and recipe-related Instagram video that took a different approach than BuzzFeed Tasty. In this video, Milan-based food stylist Livia Sala captured the process of making ravioli on video, complete with cute “commentary” from some of the ingredients on the list.

Instead of using fluid video, Sala uses a series of still shots, one after another. This is called a “stop action video” from still photos, which you can create by taking still photos and uploading them to iMovie on your computer or phone. This is a great video because it’s delightful and fun — are you seeing the trend here? The post was a Shorty Award finalist for Best Instagram Video in 2013.

https://www.instagram.com/p/e2lhv5nXxD/embed/captioned/?v=7

7. Allstate

Think insurance companies are limited to boring content? Allstate has always set themselves apart from the crowd with their entertaining commercials and social media presence.

But they don’t just put out the same videos on every one of their social outlets. Instead, they carefully cater their content to the platform they’re publishing on. (For example, this YouTube video of theirs looks like a normal commercial, but turns into a “choose your own adventure” type game.)

On Instagram, some of the videos they post are video memes — this is a meme format we haven’t seen many brands use. People love memes on Instagram because they’re funny and shareable, and folks tend to tag their friends in the comments, thereby expanding the post’s reach. That’s exactly what happens with Allstate’s video memes, like the one below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BD-0PyjnnPh/embed/captioned/?v=7

8. Ikea

Here’s an example of a short, snackable video that showcases a product in a funny way. In this case, Ikea’s showing off its anti-slip mat with a scene of a dad chasing his son (who happens to be wearing a hilarious monster costume).

This video is great because it doesn’t just show what the product looks like. In fact, you barely see the product itself. Instead, it shows the product’s benefits — and in a way that lets viewers see the brand’s personality. Instagram users love seeing personality behind Instagram content, which is why it does so well for engagement. So the next time you want to showcase a new product, consider showing it off in a humorous way.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BE1G9k0wpUS/embed/captioned/?v=7

9. Camp Brand Goods

This Canadian outdoor adventure apparel company consistently posts great content on Instagram. Not only is their Instagram content always high quality, but they use it to showcase the lifestyle they build around their products, not just the products themselves.

“[On Instagram,] it’s less about the product than it is about sharing good times,” said Camp Brand Goods’ Leslie McNeilly. “We tend to post an even mix of scenery shots and product shots. We created our own hashtag [#keepitwild], and we award a T-shirt weekly to an Instagram user who is caught keeping it wild.”

While they haven’t done many videos, the one below is a great one. It has the same look and feel as their photos on Instagram, especially with that vintage, faded look, with perfectly matching music.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BAATIncMLqN/embed/captioned/?v=7

10. Ben & Jerry’s

Here’s an example of a great product announcement video on Instagram from Ben & Jerry’s. We love that the video shows a fictional way the product was made — as if it were as easy as putting cookie dough and Oreos in an empty pint and shaking it up. It’s another great way for a brand to show its personality using short videos.

The video’s playful tone is perfect for Instagram — and so is the length. Although Instagram is starting to allow longer videos, it’s important to remember that users are often scrolling through their feeds when they come upon a video, and many may not want to watch for more than ten or twenty seconds. This would’ve been a great video to share on Facebook, too, because of that playful tone and short length.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BFO1heoxkBJ/embed/captioned/?v=7

11. Wistia

How-to videos are a popular video format for many brands — but the key is making these videos interesting enough for the Instagram platform. The folks at Wistia did a great job of using cool angles along with text to capture viewers’ attention right away — without them needing to turn the sound on. (In fact, this video doesn’t have sound at all.)

Then, they used the caption to point viewers to the link in their bio for the full instructional video. (Note: When you ask people to follow a link in your Instagram bio, make sure you make that link trackable.)

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEENUaVgYX9/embed/captioned/?v=7

12. CBRE

Nothing like a breathtaking time lapse to mesmerize your followers on Instagram. You might not think a commercial real estate and investment services firm like CBRE would have beautiful content to post, but it’s videos like this that have the ability to showcase the more visually pleasing sides of the industry.

Even if you work for a “boring” industry, you can come up with creative ideas that cater to what type of content your audience wants. One key thing to keep in mind — especially on Instagram’s platform — is to make your content relatable and approachable. In other words, make it human. No one who’s scrolling through their Instagram feed wants to see a cut-and-dry product update. They’ll scroll right past it and on to their friend’s video of his cat.

Instead, produce videos that help you form an emotional connection with your fans, as CBRE did with this stunning video, the beauty of which anyone can appreciate.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BFMDj8rPwIw/embed/captioned/?v=7

13. Califia Farms

Califia Farms is another brand that consistently creates awesome Instagram content. They tend to post a solid mix of photos and video content, including fun, playful videos and GIFs like the one below. Here, they’re announcing a new product with a sort of “slow reveal” — but one that’s visually compelling enough for users to stick around.

If you like the idea of posting animated videos to your own Instagram account, they aren’t actually all that difficult and expensive to create. Here’s a list of 10 easy-to-use tools for creating animated photos and videos to get you started.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BA2k1iUq6AD/embed/captioned/?v=7

14. Flixel Photos

Here’s a stunning image from Flixel Photos. … Or is it a video? It’s actually something called a “cinemagraph,” which is kind of a combination of the two. A cinemagraph is a file format used to create short, infinitely-looping animations for the web that look like images with a moving component. The effect is really cool: It’s like experiencing a living moment.

Creating a cinemagraph isn’t as hard as it looks. Here are seven tips from Flixel photos on making your cinemagraphs remarkable.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BBCuwJxxg61/embed/captioned/?v=7

15. Dunkin’ Donuts

A video doesn’t have to be long to be successful. In fact, the video below from Dunkin’ Donuts is literally three still images put together into a video. This is another example of a “stop action video” from still photos, which you can create by taking still photos and uploading them to iMovie on your computer or phone.

While this video is super simple, what makes it great is its timeliness (in celebration of Mother’s Day) and that it’s funny, unexpected, and therefore shareable. Donuts given like flowers? Yes, please.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BFJb4McjynC/embed/captioned/?v=7

16. WeWork

Another great use case for Instagram? Showcasing your company culture. Instagram’s a great platform for positioning your brand as a friendly face and building a voice and personality to build a relationship with followers. It doesn’t hurt for recruitment, either.

Here’s a wonderful and whimsical video that cuts together short clips from WeWork’s company party. Kids breakdancing, someone dressed up as a snowman, employees talking and laughing … they did a great job of showcasing the employees’ personalities and making the party look really fun.

https://www.instagram.com/p/_uNqw2TP9Y/embed/captioned/?v=7

17. Saturday Night Live

The American TV show Saturday Night Live produces great video content by its very nature — but that’s not the only reason why their Instagram videos are so good. They have their Instagram promotion down to a science.

“It’s found a successful formula for extending each show way past the broadcast date, and for re-purposing TV content for the online generation, with micro-video playing a huge part of that,” writes Carla Marshall for ReelSEO.com. “Take the 2nd April show, which featured Game of Thrones actor Peter Dinklage, and singer Gwen Stefani. Both appeared in a very odd little sketch called ‘Space Shorts/Pants’ which SNL then uploaded to Facebook, and YouTube, and to Instagram, where it generated over 70K views. By using its social media presence, the brand was able to extend the buzz around the sketch for days, even weeks, after.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/BDufSpkMNIc/embed/captioned/?v=7

Struggling to create short but sweet Instagram content that drives engagement with your business? Download some inspiring Instagram post and story templates below to improve your game.

Instagram Templates

from Marketing https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/instagram-video-examples

29 Simple Ways to Grow Your Email List

I have some bad news: Your email marketing database degrades by about 22.5% every year.

Your contacts’ email addresses change as they move from one company to another, opt-out of your email communication, or abandon that old AOL address they only use to fill out forms on websites.

As a marketer, it’s your job to make sure you’re constantly adding fresh contacts to your email marketing campaigns so you can keep your numbers moving up and to the right. (But not by purchasing email lists — learn why you should never buy an email list in this post.)

Click here to download our free beginner's guide to email marketing.

If you’re not working on building your email list already, or you’ve run out of ideas to do so, here are 29 simple ways to grow that email list.

29 Creative List Building Techniques

Using Email

1. Create remarkable email content

Your content needs to be amazing if you want people to stay subscribed and forward your emails to their own network. If it’s entertaining enough, they’ll always look forward to your emails.

2. Encourage subscribers to share and forward your emails

Include social sharing buttons and an “Email to a Friend” button in your marketing emails. That way, you’ll gain access to their friends, colleagues, and networks and expand your contact list. At the bottom of your emails, include a “Subscribe” CTA as a simple text-based link so that the people receiving the forwarded emails can easily opt-in, too.

3. Segment your email lists by buyer persona

Use varying types of email subscriptions to send more targeted content to specific segments of your marketing personas. Email recipients are more likely to click through emails that cater to their specific interests, so if you create multiple, targeted subscription types, you’ll increase the chance that visitors will subscribe to one of them.

4. Reinvigorate a stale email list with an opt-in campaign

Do you have an older list that you suspect has mostly decayed? Create an engaging opt-in message and send it to your old list encouraging contacts who wish to re-opt-in — promising to remove all contacts who don’t respond. Though it might seem counterintuitive to remove folks from your email lists in order to grow them, emailing only engaged contacts could improve your deliverability and increase the odds of your email getting shared with those outside your current contacts database.

5. Add a link to your employees’ signatures

Hyperlinked email signatures can lead people to a landing page where they can sign up for your mailing list. Plus, if you’re already in a natural email conversation with them, subscribing to more emails can be a natural next step.

With New Content

6. Create a new lead-generation offer 

Develop a free ebook or whitepaper and host it on a landing page that asks visitors to provide their email address in order to download it. This is called a “gated offer.” (Need ideas? This blog post lists 23 ways to create lead-generation content quickly and easily.)

7. Create a free online tool or resource

Free online tools make your users’ lives easier, and all they have to do is sign up with their email address. For example, we’ve created quite a few free tools, like Marketing Grader, to gather email addresses.

8. Create ‘Bonus’ Content

Not all gated content is worth it to a website visitor. In order to gain their interest, you need to give them free content first. Start with a blog post that offers beginner advice on a subject, then offer “bonus” content with more advanced tips that they can access by submitting their email address via a landing page.

Using Social Media

9. Promote an online contest

Use your social media accounts to host a free giveaway in exchange for contact information. Encourage entrants to click through to your website and sign up using their email address. 

10. Promote one of your lead-gen offers on Twitter

Create a Twitter campaign to promote an ebook or a free resource to your followers that requires an email address to redeem. 

11. Promote an offer through Facebook that requires an email address

Promote content on your Facebook Timeline that your followers can sign up to access. Be sure to add social sharing buttons to the landing pages and thank-you pages you send them to so you encourage your leads to share those offers with their own networks.

12. Add a call-to-action button to the top of your Facebook Business Page

We added calls-to-action (CTAs) on our Facebook page for HubSpot Academy below. The value in this list building technique is in the destination: Link your Facebook page’s CTA button to a landing page that requires an email address for access to a special resource.

Facebook business page for HubSpot Academy with Sign Up button for email list building

13. Publish links to gated offers via social media

Use your Facebook Business page or LinkedIn Company Page to post links to the same gated offers you might also host on your blog posts. You can also do this in appropriate and relevant LinkedIn group discussions — just be mindful of the topic being discussed to ensure your offer is a welcome addition to the conversation.

14. Use Pinterest to promote gated visual content

Pinterest can play host to visual content that encourages visitors to sign up to see more content. For example, HubSpot created a Pinterest board where we pin the well-designed covers of our marketing ebooks. From this board, we’ve been able to generate new leads and grow our email list.

hubspot-ebooks-pinterest

15. Add engagement features to your YouTube channel

Add hyperlinked “end cards” to your YouTube videos that encourage people to subscribe to your channel via their email address. You can see an example of this below, to the bottom right of the video screen. You can also include links to relevant landing pages in your videos’ text captions below your published video.

End card on HubSpot YouTube video for email list building

On Your Website

16. Ask website visitors for feedback

People enjoy offering feedback on information that pertains to them. On certain pages of your website, include a form that asks visitors what questions they might have about your business. You might also create a live chat tool that invites questions and email addresses from people who have stayed on your website for a certain amount of time.

17. Shorten the length of your lead-capturing forms

It’s tempting to collect as much information on a user as possible right away, but adding too many fields to your landing pages and lead-capturing forms can actually scare people off. Reduce the length of your forms to just two to three fields — you can collect more information from them once you start a conversation.

18. Link to offers across your website that capture email signups

Don’t make people dig around your site to stumble across subscription options. Keep your offers up front, and include calls-to-action on multiple pages of your website. Some key places to consider include your website’s homepage, your ‘About Us’ page, and your ‘Contact Us’ page.

19. A/B test different campaign copy

You might be doing all the right things to generate leads — landing pages, gated content, contests, and more. The problem might be that the design or copy itself isn’t driving the engagement you need. A/B test (also known as “split test”) different aspects of your list-building campaigns with different versions of the same content. This includes the call-to-action text, the color of the gated offer, the time of day you’re posting to social media, and even where on your website these signup forms are placed. Sometimes a small change can drive hundreds more conversions.

20. Create a blog that readers can subscribe to

If you don’t already blog, you should! Blog posts help you increase your ranking on search engines like Google, and allow you collect blog subscribers that you can then upgrade to more actionable email campaigns over time.

21. Guest blog for other websites with a call-to-action

There are tons of websites and publishers out there that cater to your audience — and larger portions of it. Guest blogging for these websites helps you expand your contact list to this audience. When creating content as a guest blogger for another website, include a call-to-action, as well as a link in you author byline, for readers to subscribe to your site’s blog or email newsletter.

22. Include customer reviews on your website and landing pages

Customer reviews are the “social proof” that encourages people to join in on something. It’s one thing for you to tell people to sign up for a campaign, but it’s another thing for your happiest customers to say it too. Publish your best reviews from communities like Yelp right to your website. This adds genuine value to your landing pages when people are on the fence about submitting their contact information. 

With a Partner

23. Run a promotion on a partner website or email newsletter

Similar to guest blogging, partner websites can allow you to target a new but appropriate audience with a campaign on your own website. Use this partner source to direct visitors back to your website — where you’re already collecting email addresses.

24. Host a co-marketing offer with a partner 

Creating an ebook or webinar with a partner can split up the work of content creation and allow you to share the audience of a similar business. After you release your content, split the leads you generate with your partner.

With Traditional Marketing

25. Collect email addresses at a trade show 

Offline events like trade shows are highly anticipated growth opportunities for professionals in your industry. Demo your latest product at an appropriate conference and collect signups in-person. Once you’re back at the office, import these signups into your contact database. Be sure to send these contacts a welcome email that confirms their opt-in to your list. (See #8 in this blog post for tips on sending welcome emails.)

26. Host your own offline, in-person events

Meetups, seminars, hackathons, educational panels, and even your own conferences put you front and center of a networking event, and those who attend are often more qualified to be contacted because they came to your event. Take the opportunity to collect email addresses in exchange for the info and demos you provide at the event.

27. Host an online webinar

Webinars are the perfect opportunity to talk about your industry and access the audience of thought leaders whom you might want to present with. The best part? Webinars are normally registered for via email, making your listeners more willing to be contacted afterward. Collect email addresses at registration.

28. Add QR codes to your display ads

Incorporate a QR code into your print marketing collateral that people can scan for more information on the printed content. Create the QR code such that it requires an email address to access the additional content. (There are many free QR code makers online that make this process easy.)

29. Collect emails in your store

If you have a brick-and-mortar presence where you interact with customers face-to-face, create an email campaign just for those walk-ins. Launch a store membership they can sign up for via email at the register. This is a smart way to keep in touch with repeat customers and reward their loyalty to your product.

These are all examples of things you can start doing today to increase your business’ email database. Many of them are not complicated or difficult to implement. The key is to attack email list-building from as many angles as possible.

As you grow your email list with fresh, opt-in contacts, you’ll be able to nurture them with middle-of-the-funnel offers that allow you to convert early-stage leads into sales-ready leads.

lead flows

 
Free Download Beginner’s Guide to Email Marketing

from Marketing https://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/32028/25-clever-ways-to-grow-your-email-marketing-list.aspx

Havas helia continue to show the way with loyalty award success

They say once is luck, twice is coincidence and three times is a specialism a principal proven  by Customer Engagement agency Havas helia and the Pets At Home VIP programme winning for Best Loyalty Programme of the Year – Retail Non Food for the third time as well as picking up the coveted Best Programme of the Year.

Havas helia have been working with Pets at Home since the inception of the VIP programme helping the scheme grow at pace in the months following the launch of the scheme in 2012.  Recently VIP has passed 6million members and can boast 50% of the UK’s Very Important Pets as members.

The close working partnership with Pets At Home, GI Insight and Havas helia has helped position loyalty at the heart of the business, not only opening up a valuable channel to communicate with owners, but transformational insight that is helping the Pets At Home business to grow and adapt to the ever changing retail environment.

David MacMillan, MD of Havas helia Cirencester says “ Every agency wants a client like Pets At Home.  The close working relationship and clear focus of the scheme allows us to produce work that connects with pet owners and helps make a difference to their and their pets lives.  Winning awards such as this demonstrates our credentials as a leading CRM and Loyalty agency.”

Notes to editors:

About Havas helia Cirencester:

The birthplace of data driven marketing in the UK

Previously Brann, EHS Brann, Havas EHS

Staff:  120

Managing Director:  David MacMillan

Specialisms:  CRM, Retail Loyalty, Data management & insight, Direct response marketing.

Clients:  Pets At Home, Gap, Subway, Starbucks, Volvo, GWR, Diageo, Royal Mail  and Organix.

 

DMA Winners:  2016 Gap, 2017 Pets At Home, Subway

Data IQ:  Winners 2016, 2017

Loyalty award winners, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018

The post Havas helia continue to show the way with loyalty award success appeared first on TheMarketingblog.

from TheMarketingblog http://www.themarketingblog.co.uk/2018/06/havas-helia-continue-to-show-the-way-with-loyalty-award-success/